10 Secrets about Listening You Can Learn From TV


Enjoy the cinema


10 Secrets about Listening You Can Learn From TV

With the recent development in technology and much other advancement, a lot of people have been carried away with the tide of “busyness” that they have little or no time for friends and family members. No matter how busy we may seem to be an effective listening technique which is an essential ingredient to effective communication is very important for our daily living. A lot of people carry heavy burdens that need to be shared with others but, everyone is too busy to give a listening thereby resulting into big problems and health challenges. It is commonly said that a problem shared is half-solved. The question is who do we share the problem with when no one is ready to listen? Here are some listening secrets you can learn from the TV:

  • Those who listen to their partners or friends are more intimate than those who pay less attention. Any time you see a couple or friends that are very close and having cordial relationship, it is an indication that both are good listeners.
  • From TV, you can learn that effective listening is synonymous with effective communication. When friends and family members talk and the other party listens, there will be communication flow.
  • You learn from TV that a lot of information is lost due to impatience in listening to what the other person is saying. This secret is daily experienced by many people.
  • Another secret of listening you can learn from TV is the fact that good listeners are good learners. They have wide range of experiences as they learn through silence.
  • You will learn from TV that talkative are never good listeners while the naturally quiet people are the best listeners. Experience has corroborated this TV secret as Talkative are too impatient to wait for others to talk.
  • Another secret is that any relationship that is not thriving and successful is because one of the parties is not a good listener. A lot of marriages would have been better and saved from divorce if there was a good listener.
  • This secret is very essential as parents would wish their grownups. Most listeners are intelligent people. Your ability to listen shows you are very intelligent. You want to weigh things carefully in your mind before saying it out.
  • A good listener does not interrupt. A good listener would rather wait for you to finish everything you have to say before jumping to conclusion which will lead to wise decision.
  • A good listener will not be listening and looking elsewhere. Rather, he will be attentive and look into the eyes of the speaker to prove that he is with the speaker spirit, soul and body.
  • Wherever good listening is practised, there will be peace, love, happiness, trust and mutual understanding.

The importance of good listening cannot be overemphasised.  Listening has the power to save your marriage as well as your money. She can help to build your career and also friendship.

“We have two ears and one mouth, so we should listen more than we say.” ~ Zeno of Citium

A Selection of Customer Service Quotes

“Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.”  ~ Stephen R. Covey


“Listen to God with a broken heart. He is not only the doctor who mends it, but also the father who wipes away the tears.”     ~ Criss Jami


“We have two ears and one mouth, so we should listen more than we say.” ~ Zeno of Citium



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Wonderful Definitions



Wonderful Definitions


Wonderful Definitions



Wonderful Definitions

 



adjective

  1. Wonderful is defined as an amazing, astonishing, excellent or enjoyable person, thing or event.
    1. An example of wonderful is watching a fireworks display; a wonderful experience.
    2. An example of wonderful is finding out you just won the lottery; a wonderful discovery.
    3. An example of wonderful is meeting your baby for the first time; a wonderful event.

YourDictionary definition and usage example. Copyright © 2014 by LoveToKnow Corp  http://www.yourdictionary.com/wonderful 


Wonderful Definitions


Prayer for those in trouble


prayer_blog2


Prayer for those in trouble

Lord, I just want to say THANK YOU,
Because this morning I woke up and knew where my children were.

Because this morning my home was still standing,
Because this morning I am not crying
Because my spouse, my child, my brother or sister, my parent does not need to be buried
or to be pulled out from underneath a pile of concrete,

Because this morning I was able to drink a glass of water,
Because this morning I was able to turn on the light,
Because this morning I was able to take a shower,
Because this morning I was not planning a funeral,

But most of all I thank  you this morning because I still have life and a voice to cry out for those in trouble.
Lord I cry out to you, the One that makes the impossible, possible,

The One that turns darkness in to light,
I cry out that You give those mothers strength,

That  You give them peace that surpasses all understanding,
That  You may open the streets so that help can come,
That You may provide doctors, nurses, food, water, and all that they need in a blink of an eye.

For all those that have lost family members, give them peace, give them hope, give them courage to continue to go on!
Protect the children and shield them with your power.

I pray all this in the name of Jesus!!!

Author ~Unknown

 


Quote:

 
“God is our refuge and strength, an ever-present help in trouble. Therefore we will not fear, though the earth give way and the mountains fall into the heart of the sea, though its waters roar and foam and the mountains quake with their surging.”
~ Psalm 46


those-with-knowledge
  

Classic Insights: I love first graders


Classic Insights: I love first graders


Today’s Humor…
1st grade school teacher had twenty-six students in her class. She presented each child in her classroom the 1st half of a well-known proverb and asked them to come up with the remainder of the proverb.
It’s hard to believe these were actually done by first graders 

 

Their insight may surprise you. 

While reading, keep in mind that these are first-graders, 6-year-olds, because the last one is a classic! 

1.  Don’t change horses  until they stop running. 

2.  Strike while the  bug is close. 

3.  It’s always darkest before  Daylight Saving Time. 

4.  Never underestimate the power of  termites.. 

5.  You can lead a horse to water but  How? 

6.  Don’t bite the hand that  looks dirty.

7.  No news is  impossible 

8.  A miss is as good as a  Mr. 

9.  You can’t teach an old dog new  Math

10.  If you lie down with dogs, you’ll  stink in the morning. 

11.  Love all, trust  Me. 

12.  The pen is mightier than the  pigs. 

13.  An idle mind is  the best way to relax. 

14.  Where there’s smoke there’s  pollution. 

15.  Happy the bride who  gets all the presents. 

16.  A penny saved is  not much.. 

17.  Two’s company, three’s  the Musketeers.

18.  Don’t put off till tomorrow what  you put on to go to bed.

19.  Laugh and the whole world laughs with you, cry and You have to blow your nose. 

20.  There are none so blind as  Stevie Wonder. 

21.  Children should be seen and not  spanked or grounded. 

22.  If at first you don’t succeed  get new batteries. 

23.  You get out of something only what you  See in the picture on the box 

24.  When the blind lead the blind  get out of the way. 

25.  A bird in the hand  is going to poop on you.



And the WINNER and last one! 

  

26.  Better late than  Pregnant!!!

Pregnant lady with onlookers

JOKE:- SOUTH AUCKLAND VASECTOMY

An Auckland couple had 9 children.

They went to the doctor to see about getting the husband “fixed.”

The doctor gladly started the required procedure and asked them what finally made them make the decision — why, after nine children, would they choose to do this.

The husband replied that they had read in a recent article that one out of every ten children being born in New Zealand was Chinese, and they didn’t want to take a chance on having a Chinese baby because neither of them could speak the language!

 


Quote:

Here is one of the greatest questions you will ever ask and answer:“What one skill, if I developed and did it in an excellent fashion, would have the greatest positive impact on my career?”  ~Brian Tracy          
 
 
Good question – just CHANGE the LAST WORD to “LIFE”!

 

THE OLDER CROWD


 

THE OLDER CROWD 


THE OLDER CROWD  


A distraught senior citizen Phoned her doctor’s office. ‘Is it true,’ she wanted to know, ‘that the medication You prescribed has to be taken For the rest of my life?’


‘Yes, I’m afraid so,’ the doctor told her.


There was a moment of  silence Before the senior lady replied, ‘I’m wondering, then, Just how serious is my condition Because this  prescription is marked


‘NO REPEATS’.

***********************


An older gentleman was On the operating table Awaiting surgery And he insisted that his son, A renowned surgeon, Perform the operation.


As he was about to get the anesthesia, He asked to speak to his  son. ‘Yes, Dad, what is it? ‘


‘Don’t be nervous, son; Do your best And just remember, If it doesn’t go well  , If something happens to me… Your mother Is going to come and Live with you and your wife.’


                Aging: Eventually you will reach a point When you stop lying about your age And start bragging about it.


The older we get, The fewer things Seem worth waiting in line  for. 


Some people Try to turn back their odometers. Not me! I want people to know ‘why’ I look this way… I’ve traveled a long way And some of the roads weren’t paved.


When you are dissatisfied And would like to go back to youth, Think of Algebra.


You know you are getting old when Everything either dries up or leaks.


One of the many things No one tells you about aging Is that it is such a nice change >From being young.


old-people-on-computer-256x300

 


Ah, being young is beautiful, But being old is  comfortable.


First you forget names, Then you forget faces. Then you forget to pull up your zipper. It’s worse when You forget to pull it down.


  Long ago, When men cursed And beat the ground with sticks, It was called witchcraft… Today, it’s called golf.

 

Lord, please… Keep Your arm around my shoulder, And, Your hand over my mouth!

~Author Unknown



“When I was a young man, I wanted to change the world.  I found it was difficult to change the world, so I tried to change my nation. 
 

When I found I couldn’t change the nation, I began to focus on my town.  I couldn’t change the town and as an older man, I tried to change my family. 
 

Now, as an old man, I realize the only thing I can change is myself, and suddenly I realize that if long ago I had changed myself, I could have made an impact on my family. 
 

My family and I could have made an impact on our town.  Their impact could have changed the nation and I could indeed have changed the world.”


~Unknown



Ah, being young is beautiful, But being old is comfortable.

Before they call, I will answer


Before they call, I will answer 

This beautiful story was written by a doctor who worked in Central Africa

One night I had worked hard to help a mother in the labor ward; but in spite of all we could do, she died, leaving us with a tiny, premature baby and a crying two-year-old daughter. We would have difficulty keeping the baby alive; as we had no incubator (we had no electricity to run an incubator). We also had no special feeding facilities..

Although we lived on the equator, nights were often chilly with treacherous drafts. One student midwife went for the box we had for such babies and the cotton wool that the baby would be wrapped in. Another went to stoke up the fire and fill a hot water bottle. She came back shortly in distress to tell me that in filling the bottle, it had  burst (rubber perishes easily in tropical climates).. And it is our last hot water bottle!’ she exclaimed. As in the West, it is no good crying over spilled milk, so in Central Africa it might be considered no good crying over burst water bottles. They do not grow on trees, and there are no drugstores down forest pathways. All right,’ I said, ‘put the baby as near the fire as you safely can, and sleep between the baby and the door to keep it free from drafts.


Your job is to keep the baby warm.’ The following noon, as I did most days, I went to have prayers with any of the orphanage children who chose to gather with me. I gave the youngsters various suggestions of things to pray about and told them about the tiny baby. I explained our problem about keeping the baby warm enough, mentioning the hot water bottle, and that the baby could so easily die if it got chills. I also told them of the two-year-old sister, crying because her mother had died. During prayer time, one ten-year-old girl, Ruth, prayed with the usual blunt   conciseness of our African children. ‘Please, God’ she prayed, ‘Send us a hot water bottle today. It’ll be no good tomorrow, God, as the baby will be dead, so please send it this afternoon.’


'Please, God' she prayed, 'Send us a hot water bottle today. It'll be no good tomorrow, God, as the baby will be dead, so please send it this afternoon.'


While I gasped inwardly at the audacity of the prayer, she added,


‘And while You are about it, would You please send a dolly for the little girl so  she’ll know You really love her?’


As often with children’s prayers, I was put on the spot. Could I honestly say ‘Amen’? I just did not believe that God could do this. Oh,  yes, I know that He can do everything; the Bible says so. But there are limits, aren’t there? The only way God could answer this particular prayer would be by sending me a parcel from the homeland. I had been in Africa for almost four years at that time, and I had never, ever, received a parcel from home.


Anyway, if anyone did send me a parcel, who would put in a hot water bottle? I lived on the equator!


Halfway through the afternoon, while I was teaching in the nurses’ training school, a message was sent that there was a car at my front door.. By the time I reached home, the car had gone, but there on the porch was a large 22-pound parcel. I felt tears pricking my eyes. I could not open the parcel alone, so I sent for the orphanage children. Together we pulled off the string, carefully undoing each knot. We folded the paper, taking care not to tear it unduly… Excitement was mounting. Some thirty or forty pairs of eyes were focused on the large cardboard box.


Some thirty or forty pairs of eyes were focused on the large cardboard box.


From the top, I lifted out brightly-colored, knitted jerseys. Eyes sparkled as I gave them out. Then there were the knitted bandages for the leprosy patients, and the children looked a little bored. Then came a box of mixed raisins and sultanas – that would make a batch of buns for the weekend.


Then, as I put my hand in again, I felt the….. could it really be? I grasped it and pulled it out. Yes, a brand new, rubber hot water bottle. I cried. I had not asked God to send it; I had not truly believed that He could.


Ruth was in the front row of the children. She rushed forward, crying out, ‘If God has sent the bottle, He must have sent the dolly, too! ‘Rummaging down to the bottom of the box, she pulled out the small, beautifully-dressed dolly. Her eyes shone! She had never doubted! Looking up at me, she asked, ‘Can I go over with you and give this dolly to that little girl, so she’ll know that Jesus really loves her?’ ‘Of  course,’ I replied! That parcel had been on the way for five whole months, packed up by my former Sunday school class, whose leader had heard and obeyed God’s prompting to send a hot water bottle, even to the equator. And one of the girls had put in a dolly for an African child – five months before, in answer to the believing prayer of a ten-year-old to bring it ‘that afternoon’.


‘Before they call, I will answer.’ (Isaiah 65:24)


'Before they call, I will answer.' (Isaiah 65:24)


When you read this, say the prayer. That’s all you have to do. Prayer is one of the best free gifts we receive. There is no cost, but a lot of rewards.

Let’s continue praying for one another. This awesome prayer takes less than a minute.

Heavenly Father, I ask you to bless my friends reading this. I ask You to minister to their spirit. Where there is pain, give them Your peace and mercy. Where there is self doubting, release a renewed confidence to work through them.. Where there is tiredness or exhaustion, I ask You to give them understanding, guidance, and strength. Where there is fear, reveal Your love and release to them Your courage. Bless their finances, give them greater  vision, and raise up leaders and friends to support and encourage them. Give each of them discernment to recognize the evil forces around them and reveal to them the power they have in You to defeat it. I ask You to do these things in Jesus’ name.   Amen.


 Author: Unknown


Quote:

“Gratitude, like faith, is a muscle. The more you use it, the stronger it grows, and the more power you have to use it on your behalf. If you do not practice gratefulness, its benefaction will go unnoticed, and your capacity to draw on its gifts will be diminished. To be grateful is to find blessings in everything, This is the most powerful attitude to adopt, for there are blessings in everything.” ~Alan Cohen 

 

My Trip to Burundi AFRICA


My Trip to Burundi AFRICA


 

adults had a full medical check and all the data was recorded into their own personal record folders. To date, this had not been done so this was a ground breaking trip.


To Dr Scott and Nurse Pam the children of Homes of Hope say “Morakoze Chaney” (Thank you very much) The team consisted of a Doctor, a nurse, a financial adviser (That’s me @RichardBejah), a Pastor, a mechanic, a young lady with a HUGE heart for kids, 2 teenagers and team leader Ted Bosveld. A varied team of people but all with one passion to make a difference in this broken world we live in, One child at a time.



burundi-east-africa-pushing-a-load-on-a-bike


Royal-Drummers-1 (1)


Villages of Life: 


Tasmanian Ted Bosveld initiated the Burundi Villages of Life program in order to fulfil his vision to build villages, each consisting of 15 houses that will house 15 widows and approximately 90 orphans.


Each house will provide shelter for 6 orphans and a house mother/parent that will give a sense of structured family life where once there was none. A school for 300 students servicing the village and the surrounding population, a TAFE workshop for carpentry, metalwork and sewing, as well as a medical centre are also part of the vision, and will serve to develop a more integrated community.


We will be delighted to explain how you can make an impact on Burundi as you holiday amongst Burundi’s generous and warm-hearted people. We have already committed to assisting school children and teachers in Burundi.


Burundi has a population of approximately 8.4 million and a land area roughly one third the size of Tasmania. 90% of the population rely on subsistence farming, while 68% of Burundi’s population live below the poverty line. You too can be part of this vision and you can Make A Difference when you book your MAD travel!


After Ted Bosveld visited the orphanage Homes of Hope Gitega in Gitega, Burundi he candidly noted… “I was amazed to see how well the children are looked after and how they lived together as a family. Their happy, smiling faces and the respect they show for their house mum was astounding.


It is unimaginable to think of where they may have been and how they would survive without the much needed assistance of ordinary people like you and me. The local people have amazing skills, but sadly no resources.”  


If you choose to travel to Burundi, you’ll be playing a vital part of supplying crucial resources to Villages of Life programs and others like it. 


img_4222

Freddy Tuyizere is the National Director of Burundi Youth for Christ. His main responsibilities are supervising the team of full-time staff, training a new generation of leaders as well as building and running a YFC orphanage in Gitega, Burundi’s second-largest city. He is married to Marie-Josse and they have three children. A typical Burundi “Villages of Life” simple house design.


We travelled with Travel With A Cause a specialist Travel Agency where you will make a difference when you travel. Phone:  61 3 6231 3844 Fax:  61 3 6231 4855


No matter what travel you book through them, you’ll be supporting very needy people in places like Burundi. Mind you, if you are capable and willing, why not travel to Burundi and at the same time, make an humanitarian impact on the nation of Burundi.


But there’s more. We offer you to chance to include a trip to our Burundi project into your overseas itinerary. This way you get to see the actual project that your trip is supporting. Overwhelmingly, those who travel on our project trips describe them as “life-changing”.  Why don’t you consider this and really make a difference when you travel?


We will be delighted to explain how you can make an impact on Burundi as you holiday amongst Burundi’s generous and warm-hearted people. We have already committed to assisting school children and teachers in Burundi.


Burundi :- 90% of the population rely on subsistence farming, while 68% of Burundi’s population live below the poverty line.


Burundi desperately requires the following: Housing Education Training facilities Medical facilities Family structure for widows and orphans and, Employment


 CLICK Here to view Donation page


The Vision of the project we assist in Burundi (Villages of Life):



Through tax-deductible donations from corporate Australia, schools, churches and families, the vision is to build villages, each consisting of 15 houses that will house 15 widows and approximately 90 orphans.


Each house will provide shelter for 6 orphans and a house mother/parent that will give a sense of structured family life where once there was none.


A school for 300 students servicing the village and the surrounding population, a TAFE workshop for carpentry, metalwork and sewing, as well as a medical centre are also part of the vision, and will serve to develop a more integrated community.


If you’d like to know how you can assist please call us on Ted Bosveld directly today and ask us how you can help. 

Ted Bosveld

ted@villagesoflife.org

Mobile (in Australia): 0417 546 473  (if calling from overseas) 61 417 546 473

If you can’t send your money, why don’t you go to Burundi and make a difference when you travel?


Burundi needs: Desks, Chairs, Computers (yes, even second-hand PCs can make all the difference providing they are in good working order), Electricians, Plumbers, Builders, Painters, Farmers, Surveyors, Dentists, Medical Practitioners, Optometrists, Tradesmen, Cooks, Hydro Engineers, Teachers, Blind/Braille Experts, Social Workers and more!

 

Sponsor a Child



Change a life!For $50 a month you can provide shelter, education,food and clothing in a loving environment for one young person in Burundi.


Make a difference

Today!


Spend a week, a month or a year at one of Burundi YFC’s projects and experience what is happening first hand!


Contact Burundi YFC Bujumbura, Burundi Office number: (+257) 22 21 0440 Mobile number: (+257) 78 85 3029 E-mail: freddy@burundiyfc.org

 


Get Involved


Gishora-Burundi


Give!


Burundi YFC functions entirely on the generosity of its supporters. We have been in awe of the what has provided through churches and individuals over the past few years. Large once-off donations of money, resources and the hard work of skilled teams have had a huge impact on the ministry, while the regular small monthly gifts of a dedicated group of people have allowed the ministry to function on a day-to-day basis.


To find out more information, or to support, please  email freddy@burundiyfc.org


Sponsor!


We are always looking for sponsors for our orphans at the Gitega & Cibitoke centres,  $50.00 a month provides the needs for a child at our orphanages.


 


To get involved or find out more information then email freddy@burundiyfc.org


  Go!


Burundians are amongst the most hospitable people, and the YFC staff would welcome with open arms anyone wanting to get involved on a short term basis, from a week to several years! We are currently in need of English teachers for our Gitega orphanage and Future Hope School, Doctors and Nurses for Shammah Medical Center in Gitega as well as general help for our Bujumbura office. If you are interested or want more information, please  email freddy@burundiyfc.org


Project Update 



 

Villages of Life


Villages Of Life

Villages Of LIFE


The Vision


draft_lens4560522module114848691photo_1283492474Villages_of_Life_White_Lo


Through donations corporation, schools, churches and families the vision is to build villages consisting of 15 houses which will house 15 widows and approx 90 orphans. Each house will have 6 orphans and a house mum/parent which will give a great sense of family where there once was none. A school for 300 students servicing the orphan village and the surrounding population creating integration, a TAFE workshop for carpentry, metalwork and sewing and a medical centre. All the building material will be sourced locally boosting the local economy. The building will be done by the local work force creating much needed employment. This also helps to avoid jealousy within the surrounding community

Villages of Life is a Non Government Organization (NGO) and is the bricks and mortar component of the vision. Youth for Christ Burundi is there to provide for the emotional, spiritual and everyday needs of widows and orphans housed in the homes. Their vision is to raise up a generation of Godly leaders through leadership training.

Villages of Life aims to build a new village every 3 years.

Villages of Life Founder

Personally visited the orphanage in Gitega Burundi a number of times. Every time I was amazed to see how well the children are looked after and how they lived together as a family. Their happy smiling faces, their freshly brushed snow white teeth and the respect they have for their house mum was astounding.

It is unimaginable to think of where they may have been and how they would survive without the help of ordinary people like you and me.

The local people have amazing skills but no resources.Villages of Life

  Ted Bosveld   ted@villagesoflife.org  Mobile (in Australia): 0417 546 473

CLICK To DONATE TODAY


About Burundi


Burundi has a population of approximately 8.4 million and a land area roughly one third the size of Tasmania where I live.

90% of the population rely on subsistence farming, while 68% live below the poverty line.



The Needs

  • Housing
  • Education
  • Training facilities
  • Medical facilities
  • Family structure for widows and orphans
  • Employment

Some cared for Orphans in Burundi's Villages Of Life


Homes of Hope Burundi in association with Villages of Life


Homes of Hope is the brand name of Youth for Christ Burundi’s orphanages. The name was inspired by the G21 mandate of raising a future generation. Burundi has been torm by many years of war and poverty and has thus resulted in many orphans; our quest is to provide a home and family for them.

We bring in children between the ages of 0-6yrs from all over the country from the 3 tribes. We have 2 orphanages; one located in Masenga (4 km from Gitega city centre) while the other in Cibitoke Province.

Each centre is designed to primarily have an Orphanage, Medical Centre, and School. The centres were created so that as Youth for Christ we can play a transformational role in the surrounding communities by providing educational opportunities and quality affordable medical treatment as well.


Sponsor a Child


Sponsor a Child


Change a life! For $50 a month you can provide shelter, education,food and clothing in a loving environment for one young person in Burundi.

Make a difference Today!

Spend a week, a month or a year at one of Burundi YFC’s projects and experience what is happening first hand!


Contact Burundi YFC Bujumbura, Burundi Office number: (+257) 22 21 0440 Mobile number: (+257) 78 85 3029 E-mail: freddy@burundiyfc.org


Get Involved Give!


Burundi YFC functions entirely on the generosity of its supporters. We have been in awe of the what has provided through churches and individuals over the past few years. Large once-off donations of money, resources and the hard work of skilled teams have had a huge impact on the ministry, while the regular small monthly gifts of a dedicated group of people have allowed the ministry to function on a day-to-day basis.


To find out more information, or to support, please  click here! 


Sponsor!


We are always looking for sponsors for our orphans at the Gitega center, and soon to be, our Cibitoke center. $50.00 a month provides the needs for a child at our orphanage.



To get involved or find out more information, click here!   


Go! Burundians are amongst the most hospitable people, and the YFC staff would welcome with open arms anyone wanting to get involved on a short term basis, from a week to several years! We are currently in need of English teachers for our Gitega orphanage and Future Hope School, Doctors and Nurses for Shammah Medical Center in Gitega as well as general help for our Bujumbura office. If you are interested or want more information, please click here!


My involvement?

Richard 555075_300


I went to Burundi for my first time on 4th November 2010 and I had a fantastic “Heart Plunge” experience.




 


Quote:

“Leadership is sacrificing your life or even suffering in order to change what needs to be changed” – Unknown




Six (6) lessons about the way we treat people

 


Six (6) lessons about the way we treat people

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Six (6) lessons about the way we treat people

 

1. – First Important Lesson.
– Cleaning Lady

During my second month of college, our professor gave us a pop quiz I was a conscientious student and had breezed through the questions until I read The last one:

“What is the first name of the woman who cleans the school?”

Surely this was some kind of joke.

I had seen the Cleaning woman several times.

She was tall, dark-haired and in her 50’s, but how would I know her name?

I handed in my paper, leaving the last question Blank. Just before class ended, one student asked if The last question would count toward our quiz grade. “Absolutely, ” said the professor.

“In your careers, You will meet many people. All are significant..

They Deserve your attention and care, even if all you do Is smile and say “hello.” I’ve never forgotten that lesson

 Cleaning Lady

A LESSON Learned:-  I also learned her Name was Dorothy.


2. – Second Important Lesson.
– Pickup in the Rain


One night, at 11:30 P.M.,an older African American woman was standing on the side of an Alabama highway

Trying to endure a lashing rain storm.. Her car had broken down and she desperately needed a ride.

Soaking wet, she decided to flag down the next car.

A young white man stopped to help her, generally Unheard of in those conflict-filled 1960’s.

The man took her to safety, helped her get assistance and put her into a taxicab. She seemed to be in a big hurry, but wrote down his address and thanked him.

Seven days went by and a knock came on the man’s door.

To his surprise, a Giant console color TV was delivered to his home.

A Special note was attached.

It read: “Thank you so much for assisting me on the highway The other night. The rain drenched not only my Clothes, but also my spirits.

Then you came along. Because of you, I was able to make it to my dying Husband’s’ bedside just before he passed away…

God Bless you for helping me and unselfishly serving Others.”

Pickup in the Rain


A LESSON Learned:-
Sincerely, Mrs. Nat King Cole


3 – Third Important Lesson.
– Always remember those Who serve


In the days when an ice cream sundae cost much less, A 10-year-old boy entered a hotel coffee shop and Sat at a table. A waitress put a glass of water in Front of him.

“How much is an ice cream sundae?” he asked. “Fifty cents,” replied the waitress.

The little boy pulled his hand out of his pocket and studied the coins in it. “Well, how much is a plain dish of ice cream?” he inquired.

By now more people were waiting for a table and the Waitress was growing impatient. “Thirty-five cents,” she brusquely replied.

The little boy again counted his coins. “I’ll have the plain ice cream,” he said.

The waitress brought the ice cream, put the bill on The table and walked away The boy finished the ice Cream, paid the cashier and left..

When the waitress Came back, she began to cry as she wiped down the Table.

There, placed neatly beside the empty dish, Were two nickels and five pennies..

A LESSON Learned:-  You see, he couldn’t have the sundae, because he had to have enough left to leave her a tip.

Always remember those Who serve


4 – Fourth Important Lesson.
– The obstacle in Our Path


In ancient times, a King had a boulder placed on a roadway. Then he hid himself and watched to see if Anyone would remove the huge rock. Some of the King’s’ wealthiest merchants and courtiers came by
and simply walked around it.

Many loudly blamed the King for not keeping the roads clear, but none did anything about getting the stone out of the way. Then a peasant came along carrying a load of vegetables.

Upon approaching the boulder, the peasant laid down his burden and tried to move the stone to the side of the road. After much pushing and straining, he finally succeeded.

After the peasant picked up his load of vegetables, he noticed a purse lying in the road where the boulder had been. The purse contained many gold coins and a note from the King indicating that the gold was for the person who removed the boulder from the roadway.

The peasant learned what many of us never understand!

The obstacle in Our Path


A LESSON Learned:-
  Every obstacle presents an opportunity to improve our condition.


5 – Fifth Important Lesson
– Giving When it Counts


Many years ago, when I worked as a volunteer at a hospital, I got to know a little girl named Liz who was suffering from a rare & serious disease.

Her only chance of recovery appeared to be a blood transfusion from her 5-year old brother, who had miraculously survived the same disease and had developed the antibodies needed to combat the illness.

The doctor explained the situation to her little brother, and asked the little boy if he would be willing to give his blood to his sister.

I saw him hesitate for only a moment before taking a deep breath and saying,

“Yes I’ll do it if it will save her.” As the transfusion progressed, he lay in bed next to his sister and smiled, as we all did, seeing the color returning to her cheek.

Then his face grew pale and his smile faded. He looked up at the doctor and asked with a trembling voice,

“Will I start to die right away?”.

Giving When it Counts

A LESSON Learned:-  Being young, the little boy had misunderstood the doctor; he thought he was going to have to give his sister all of his blood in order to save her.


 

Most importantly…. Work like you don’t need the money, love like you’ve never been hurt, and dance like you do when nobody’s watching.”

 

but… I thought it was this.

“You’ve gotta’ dance like there’s nobody watching,Love like you’ll never be hurt.Sing like there’s nobody listening,

And live like it’s heaven on earth.” (And speak from the heart to be heard.)

A lot of people say it’s a Mark Twain quote. William W. Purkey claims responsibility.


 

6 – Try Random acts of Kindness

Make a Difference to someones life everyday!

14 Random Acts of Kindness to Brighten Your day

 
Random acts of Kindness



A LESSON Learned:-  Fill in the gaps….. Start Random acts of kindness today!


 

Tough Times Never Last; Tough People Do



Tough Times Never Last; Tough People Do

Tough Times Never Last; Tough People Do


Author:
Robert Schuller

My daughter Carol lost her leg in a motorcycle accident in 1978. At the time, Mrs. Schuller and I were in Korea. On the long trip back to Iowa, I searched for the right thing to say. What would my first words to Carol be?

When we arrived at the hospital, I was shocked. Carol lay in her bed in intensive care, her body bruised, broken, and disfigured. But her spirits were whole and healthy. Immediately she solved the problem of what to say by speaking first: “I know why it happened, Dad. God wants to use me to help others who have been hurt.”

It was this spirit that carried her through seven months of hospitalization, intravenous feedings, and consequent collapsed veins. This positive attitude gave her the courage to fight a raging infection that threatened her life and to hang on until a new drug was released by the FDA. (It was the right drug at the right time – a real miracle.) It was that same positive attitude that helped Carol make the transition from hospital patient to a “handicapped” member of a family and school – and to feel normal and whole again.

The last picture we have of Carol with both legs is one taken when she was in her softball uniform. The athlete of the family, Carol loves to play softball. The summer after her accident, she shocked me by saying, “Dad, I’m going to sign up for softball again this year.”

ACES015

“That’s great,” I responded, not wanting to discourage her.

At that time, Carol’s artificial leg was attached just below the knee, which was so stiff she could barely bend it at a thirty-degree angle. She walked very stiffly; running was out of the question. However, I took her to the local school where all the parents were lining up with their daughters to register for the girls’ softball team. Carol signed up and went to check out her uniform.

As she swung her stiff plastic leg into the car and rested her jersey, socks, and cap in her lap, I turned to her and said, “Carol, how do you expect to play ball if you can’t run?”

With flashing eyes, she snapped back, “I’ve got that all figured out, Dad! When you hit home runs, you don’t have to run.”

My daughter is tough. She’s a survivor. She hit enough home runs that season to justify her presence on the team!

Carol inspired everyone with her tenacity, too. She had six surgeries after that first amputation. Later, she took up skiing and won a gold medal in the qualifying races that admitted her to that elite corps of skiers participating in the National Ski Championships. In March 1983, she pulled her goggles on and took her place among the champions of her country – at the young age of eighteen! Yes, she still walked with a limp. She drew curious looks from strangers. But her positive attitude and determination helped her even with that.

Several years ago, our family was privileged to be guests of the American-Hawaiian Steamship Company on a one-week cruise of the Hawaiian Islands. It was absolutely beautiful. During the trip, Carol was not in the least ashamed to be seen in shorts or swimming attire although her artificial leg covered her stump to just below the hip. But she was very conscious of the fact that people looked at her out of the corners of their eyes and wondered what had happened to her.

On this cruise, it was customary on the last night to have a talent show in which the passengers participated. Carol, then seventeen years old, surprised us by saying, “I’m going to be in the talent show tonight.” Now, Carol doesn’t sing, and of course she doesn’t dance. So, naturally, I was curious as to what she would do.

Friday night, my wife and I sat in the lounge along with six hundred other people. The stage was set in the big glorified cocktail lounge. As you can imagine, it was a very secular scene. The first acts performed were typical of amateur talent shows. Then it was Carol’s turn.

She came on stage wearing neither shorts nor Hawaiian garb, but a full-length dress. She looked beautiful. Walking up to the microphone, she said, “I really don’t know what talent is, but I thought this would be a good chance for me to give what I think I owe you all – an explanation. I know you’ve been looking at me all week, wondering about my fake leg. I thought I should tell you what happened.

“I was in a motorcycle accident. I almost died, but the doctors kept giving me blood, and my pulse came back. They amputated my leg below the knee, and later, they amputated through the knee. I spent seven months in the hospital – seven months with intravenous antibiotics to fight infection.”

She paused a moment, then continued. “If I’ve one talent, it’s this: During that time, my faith became very real to me.”

Suddenly a hush swept over the lounge. The waitresses stopped serving drinks. The glasses stopped clinking. Every eye was focused on this tall seventeen-year-old blonde.

She said, “I look at you girls who walk without a limp, and I wish I could walk that way. I can’t, but this is what I’ve learned, and I want to leave it with you: It’s not how you walk that counts, but who walks with you and with whom you walk.”

Then she paused and said, “I’d like to sing a song about my friend, my Lord.” And she sang:

And He walks with me, and He talks with me, and He tells me I am His own, and the joy we share in our time of prayer (originally, “as we tarry there”) None other has ever known.

“Thank you.” And she stepped down.

There was not a dry eye, not a life that wasn’t touched that night.

By holding on, digging in, and making the most of what happened to her, Carol taught me one of the greatest lessons I’ve ever learned:

Tough times never last, but tough people do.

When tough times come, we need to take tough action, to hold on until the tide turns for the better, to tenaciously dig in and bloom where we are planted, and to inspire people with our cheerful and positive attitude. In the process, other people will be stimulated to choose noble and positive outlooks for their lives too.

“Be of good courage, and he shall strengthen your heart, all ye that hope in the LORD.”

-Psalm 31:24

 

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Quote:

“He who loses wealth loses much; he who loses a friend loses more; but he that loses his courage loses all.”
 
 
 
  ~Miguel de Cervantes  
 
 
 
 

 


Tough Times Never Last; Tough People Do

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